Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya

(Formerly Prince of Wales Museum of Western India)


Travelling Exhibitions


The exhibitions within the Bus are inspired by students’ curricular and extra-curricular needs and are presented through exhibits, tactile replicas, demonstrative kits, interactive multi-touch tablets and audio-visual presentations to set up exhibitions in semi urban and rural areas, aimed at providing information and insights into a wide range of subjects in a fun and interactive manner. These are complemented by educational programmes and activities that offer students deeper engagement with the subject and an enriching over-all experience.The exhibitions within the Bus are inspired by students’ curricular and extra-curricular needs and are presented through exhibits, tactile replicas, demonstrative kits, interactive multi-touch tablets and audio-visual presentations to set up exhibitions in semi urban and rural areas, aimed at providing information and insights into a wide range of subjects in a fun and interactive manner. These are complemented by educational programmes and activities that offer students deeper engagement with the subject and an enriching over-all experience.

Present Exhibition:

As It Happened (March 2017 – September 2017)

AS IT HAPPENED’ is a literal English translation of the Sanskrit word ‘Itihas’ meaning history. History leaves clues in its wake through objects of various materials. Different Indian cultures of different time periods have made specific use of these materials to create their own identity which became synonymous with that period, for e.g the Bronze Age. Using sciences such as archaeology, numismatics, epigraphy, anthropology, oral histories and ethnography we are able to examine these objects as sources or clues that help us reconstruct history in its various aspects such as power and politics, social norms and faith, daily life, trade and art.

This exhibition highlights important developments in the history of India through objects and the scientific process of investigation which help in the reconstruction of history using material and oral sources. This exhibition also lays importance on the preserving these sources of historical studies for the future, thus talking about the Museum’s role in doing so, particularly Conservarte, the other Citi-CSMVS joint project. The project entails the restoration of 150 important objects of the CSMVS Collection of various types and technologies. This exhibition aims to create educational interaction that would encourage imagination and articulate on topics that would otherwise be textual.

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Highlights of the exhibition:

The exhibition will display various historical sources such as stone tools, pottery, coins, sculptures, manuscripts, textiles and archival materials. A copy of the Ashokan Edict and a 5th century Shiva sculpture from Parel will be displayed in this exhibition. The exhibition will also display some rare original first day covers and postal stamps from the Independence period. A copy of Laur Chanda manuscript will be juxtaposed with audio-visuals of members of the Rawat community singing the Laur Chanda ballads.

Expected learning outcomes

  1. Introduction to various sources of Indian history and how to reconstruct history based on what the object tells us
  2. Cross-curricular topics – the various branches of history that helps us reconstruct it - Archaeology, Numismatics, Mythology, Folklores, Epigraphy, Anthropology and Oral traditions, Ethnography
  3. Research and Analytical skills – Children scrutinize dioramas, displayed objects , audio-visual presentations, and are guided to make their own deductions, learning to distinguish facts from opinion.
  4. Reflection upon heritage –. Having introduced them to the various sciences involved in the reconstruction of history might encourage them to pursue these fields and contribute towards preservation of the sources of our rich history.
  5. Thinking about Museums – creating sensitivity about the importance of museums not only as storehouses of objects but also of our collective heritage in the form of narratives, traditions and skills
  6. Click here for Teaching Resource

Past Exhibitions:

The Magic Workers of Harappa (October 2015 – April 2016)

The Harappan civilization flourished around 2500 B.C. and spread over 680,000 square kilometers with 1500 settlements spread in northwestern South Asia. The residents of Harappan cities were perhaps the first citizens of planned cities in the history of mankind. They built straight roads, elaborate drainage systems, neatly built houses, public baths and granaries. Statuettes, toys, seals, decorative pottery and ornaments, board games testify to a highly skilled, technologically advance, prosperous society. This exhibition explored the technologies and skill of the Harappans which made possible the development of this great civilisation, and which are in practice even today and are part of our continuing traditions.

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Facts and Figures:

  • The Museum on Wheels has been functional since 20th October 2015.
  • From October 2015 – April 2016, the Museum on Wheels was visited by 27,622 visitors.
    • Students – 23,549
    • Adults – 4,073
  • The Bus visited 23 schools, 3 colleges, 8 NGOs and 5 public locations across Mumbai, Navi Mumbai, Thane, Nasik and Ratnagiri districts.
  • The total run of the Bus across western Maharashtra in this period is 4456 kilometers.

The Big Indian Toy Story (July 2016 – February 2017)

The story of Indian toys and games is as timeless as the land. The exhibition showcases traditional Indian toys as a reflection of our cultural repository of art, history, lore, traditions, values and of course, leisure. Starting from the Harappan civilisation, the culture of toys continues to exist in India and changes with time and regions. While each toy has its own story to tell, these toys can be used to craft, present and experience stories embedded in our culture. This exhibition is a joy to view for all ages. Children get to come up close with traditional toys which can be rarely found these days. Adults will an opportunity to relive their childhood through these toys that they may have grown up playing with.

Avabai Petit School students Bandra Mumbai

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Visitor at Bhakti Park Wadala Mumbai LR

Facts and Figures:

  • The Museum on Wheels rolled out with the new exhibition from July 2016.
  • From July 2016 – November 2016, the Museum on Wheels was visited by 98,968 visitors.
    • Students – 67,542
    • Adults – 31,426
  • The Bus visited 42 schools, 3 college, 2 NGOs and 6 public locations across Mumbai, Navi Mumbai, Thane, Ratnagiri and Pune.
  • The total run of the Bus across western Maharashtra in this period is 5,571 kilometers.

To invite the Museum on Wheels to your venue, go to our Bookings page to check availability and make a request